National Safety Month 2016

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Safety is Job One at Wenck

Identifying and understanding potential workplace hazards is key to determining and implementing measures to prevent injuries. An essential tool is a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) or Job Safety Analysis (JSA). This tool is a structured method to systematically identify potential safety and health hazards task by task from job initiation to job completion. The goal is to reduce or eliminate worker injuries and to ensure a safer work environment.

JHAs are not limited to jobs such as performing construction or industrial work. Any task that exposes a worker to risk of injury should be analyzed for hazards and injury prevention methods. 

How is a JHA conducted? JHA’s should be completed in the following order:

1. Break the job into steps. Do not make the steps too general or too detailed. Most jobs can be described in 6-8 steps. If a job requires many steps, divide into two or more segments, each with their own JHA. Describe what is being done instead of how it is done. 2. Identify potential safety and health hazards for each step. All hazards should be identified including those that are not obvious. A good question to ask yourself is “What could go wrong here?” Risks to look for include caught between, struck by, slips trips and falls, falling objects, weather conditions, chemicals, tools,

2. Identify potential safety and health hazards for each step. All hazards should be identified including those that are not obvious. A good question to ask yourself is “What could go wrong here?” Risks to look for include caught between, struck by, slips trips and falls, falling objects, weather conditions, chemicals, tools, machinery, and equipment. 3. Determine the preventative measures that are necessary to monitor, minimize or eliminate the hazards. List recommended safe procedures. Be specific and list exactly what needs to be done to minimize or eliminate the hazard. Consider a variety of methods, for

3. Determine the preventative measures that are necessary to monitor, minimize or eliminate the hazards. List recommended safe procedures. Be specific and list exactly what needs to be done to minimize or eliminate the hazard. Consider a variety of methods, for example engineering controls, modifying a process, changing equipment or tools, substituting a less hazardous substance, requiring personal protective equipment, and improving housekeeping.

Consider the hierarchy of controls in the following priority order: elimination, substitution, engineering controls, administrative controls and work practices. Personal protective equipment (PPE) should only be used as a last resort. If PPE is chosen, a PPE assessment must be conducted.

JHA hierarchycontrols

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

4. Share the results of the JHA with workers and contractors involved in the project. The controls listed on the JHA form are the preventative measures that must be implemented on site. Periodically inspect the job site to verify that the controls continue to be effective. If job site conditions change, the JHA must be reviewed and revised if necessary. The revised JHA must also be reviewed with employees that are involved with the project.

Wenck can help you enhance the safety of your workplace. Contact Patrick Kinney for more information and a consultation.

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Patrick Kinney

Wenck Contact

Patrick Kinney

Senior Industrial Hygienist/Safety Manager